Visiting Professor Sentenced to Death in Iran

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH Writing for University World News, Brendan O’Malley reports that Dr. Ahmadreza Djalali is facing a death sentence in Iran after being convicted of spying for Israel. At the time of his arrest and detainment, Djalali was teaching disaster medicine at two European universities—the Karolinkska Institute in Sweden and the Vrije Universiteit…

The Rush to Revoke Honors Given to Weinstein

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH In a short article for Variety, Erin Nyren has reported that the Executive Committee of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, which awarded Harvey Weinstein the Du Bois Medal in 2014, has voted to revoke the award. The statement released by the Hutchins Center reads: “We have voted…

An Explication of a Trump Sentence

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH In this first part of a multi-part article written for Information Clearing House, a media site and aggregator that I think can be fairly described as Far Left, William Blum offers the following explication of a Trump sentence. In Blum’s commentary, there is at least one remark on the projection of…

International Distribution of Billionaires

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH This is an addendum to my recent post on the increasing concentration of wealth in the United States. Writing for Business Insider, Tanza Loudenback reports: There are 1,542 billionaires in the world, according to a new report by UBS. More than 560 billionaires live in the US—the most of any country—and…

Words Coined in 1967

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH Several weeks ago, I posted a current political parody of a Simon and Garfunkel song [https://academeblog.org/2017/08/27/if-simon-and-garfunkel-were-troubadours-of-the-age-of-trump/]. Quite coincidentally, I came across this list of words coined fifty years ago, in 1967. (The Merriam-Webster website has a feature that allows you to get a list of the neologisms from any given year.)…

Wordplay IV: (Mostly) Politics Edition

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH In this series, I have highlighted headlines that are cleverly expressed, making use of puns, irony, figurative language, or unexpected word choices to grab a reader’s attention. Not surprisingly, the Trump administration has so unabashedly flouted all sorts of political conventions that headline writers have felt freer to write headlines that…

Twitter and the Many Facets of Vileness

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH An ever-lengthening list of faculty have come under fire for tweets and other social-media posts that they have made. But anyone who actually looks regularly at Twitter feeds must know three things: first, the medium itself stokes extremes of expression;  second, almost nothing that a faculty member has ever tweeted comes…

Assessing Dual Enrollment

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH In an article for University Business magazine, Jodi Helmer addresses the question “Is early college working?” She provides the following broad statistics: In 2002, 1.2 million students were earning college credits while still in high school. A decade later, the number of those participating in dual enrollment courses had almost doubled,…