Student Debt, By the Numbers: Part 4: Factors—Changes in Student Financial Aid

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

Percentage of those enrolled in public four-year institutions who received financial aid in 2009:  79%.

Percentage of those enrolled in private not-for-profit four-year institutions who received financial aid in 2009:  87%.

Percentage of those enrolled in private for-profit four-year institutions who received financial aid in 2009:  86%.

Percent of total costs covered by the average federal Pell grant in 1975:  84%.

Percent of total costs covered by the average federal Pell grant in 1995:  34%.

Grants as a percentage of student financial aid in 2004:  30%.

Loans as a percentage of student financial aid in 2004:  70%.

Average annual student aid of all kinds per student receiving aid in 2009:  $9,100.

Average annual aid in grants per student receiving grants in 2009:  $4,900.

Percentage of those enrolled in 2009 who received Pell grants:  27%.

Average amount of the federal Pell grants received in 2009:  $2,400.

Average annual aid in loans per student receiving loans in 2009:  $7,100.

Average annual aid in work-study wages per student participating in work-study in 2009:  $2,400.

Average annual aid in veterans’ benefits per student receiving such benefits in 2009:  $5,400.

Average annual loans of other kinds taken by parents of post-secondary students per student benefitting from such loans in 2009:  $10,400.

Increase by percentage in parents taking loans of other kinds to cover the cost of the post-secondary education of their children from 2005 to 2010:  70%.

Average total loans of other kinds taken by parents of post-secondary students per student benefitting from such loans and graduating in 2010:  $34,000.

Percentage of low-income family income required to pay for one year of post-secondary education in 1980:  13%.

Percentage of low-income family income required to pay for one year of post-secondary education in 2000:  25%.

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