Amateur Detectives Featured in Mystery Novels and Series Who Are College and University Professors, A-L

Cultural Representations of Higher Ed, No. 9

____________________

Gillian Adams, a professor of history (created by Nora Kelly);

Tom Allen, a professor of English (created by Marion Boyd);

Jack Amirau, a professor of science (created by Bob Reiss);

John Ashwin, a professor of Sanskrit (created by Anthony Boucher);

Carl Atwater, a professor of history (created by Mary V. Welk);

Beth Austin, a professor of English (created by Edith Skom);

Hannah Barlow, a professor of law (created by Carroll Lachnit);

Bel Barrett, a professor of English (created by Jane Isenberg);

Matthew Bartholomew, a professor of medicine (created by Susanna Gregory);

Andrew Basnett, a retired professor of botany (created by E.X. Ferrars);

Luther Bastion (created by Gavin Holt);

Akers Bellamy (created by George Goodchild);

Niccolo Benedetti, a professor of criminology (created by William DeAndrea);

James Yeates Biddle (created by John Mersereau);

Harry Bishop, a professor of political science (created by Conrad Haynes);

Vicky Bliss, a professor of history (created by Elizabeth Peters);

Stefan Borowski, a professor of English/writer-in residence (created by Lew Raphael);

Jennifer Bowen, an art professor (created by Norman Bogner);

Lou Brade (created by Isaac Asimov);

Jason Bradley, a professor of psychology (created by Gaylord Larsen);

Michael Brandon (created by P.L. Gaus);

Herman Brierly, a research scientist (created by Will Levinrew);

Dan Brodsky, a professor of mathematics (created by Erik Rosenthal);

Carl Burns, a professor of English (created by Bill Crider);

Jet Butler (created by B. Reese Johnson);

Claire Camden, a professor of English (created by Audrey Peterson);

Sir Richard Charrington, a professor of archaeology (created by Dilwyn Rees);

Sir Richard Cherrington (created by Glyn Daniel);

Copey Cliff, a retired professor (created by Eric Heath);

Henrietta O’Dwyer Collins, a professor of journalism (created by Carolyn G. Hart);

Liz Connors, a professor of English (created by Susan Kelly);

Nancy Cook, a professor of English (created by D.J.H. Jones);

Melissa Craig, a professor of English (created by Betty Rowland);

Thea Crawford, a professor of archaeology (created by Jessica Mann);

Daly, a retired professor of English (created by Eilis Dillon);

R.V. Davie, a professor of English (created by V.C. Clinton-Baddeley);

Thaddeus Davis, a professor of English (created by Addison Simmons);

Ernest DeWalt, a professor of English (created by Randall Silvis);

John Dobie, a professor of mathematics (created by Desmond Cory);

MacDougal Duff, a professor of history (created by Charlotte Armstrong);

Cliff Dunbar, a professor of English (created by Will Hariss);

Dundas (created by J.J. Connington);

Janet Eldine, a professor of psychology (created by Charlotte Epstein);

Mark Easterbrook (created by Agatha Christie);

Colin Edwards, a retired professor of archaeology, created by Gordon Randolph Willey);

Lydia Fairchild, a professor of law (created by D.R. Meredith);

William Falconer, a professor of philosophy (created by Ian Morson);

Kate Fansler, a professor of English (created by Amanda Cross);

Gervase Fen, a professor of English (created by Edmund Crispin);

Dean Cranston Fessing (created by Alfred Alcorn);

John Fowler, a professor of English (created by Herbert Dalmas);

Robert “Mongo” Fredrickson, a professor of criminology (created by George Chesbro);

Paula Glenning, a professor of English (created by Anna Clarke);

James Glowery (created by Anthony Lejeune);

James Goff (created by Anna Clarke);

Glad Gold, a professor of English (created by Theodora Wender);

Patrick Grant, a professor of English (created by Margaret Yorke);

William Gray, a professor of history (created by Cathleen Jordan);

Anneke Haagen, a professor of computer science (created by Susan Holtzer);

Curt Halstead, a professor of sociology (created by Joe Gores);

Cyrus Hatch (created by Frederick C. Davis);

Millicent Hetherege, a professor of English (created by Robert Bernard);

Philip Hoag, a professor of archaeology (created by Alex Gordon);

Nick Hoffman, a professor of English (created by Lew Raphael);

Fabian Honeychurch, a visiting professor (created by Edward Candy);

Roz Howard, a professor of English (created by Susan Kenney);

Ben Johnson, a professor of anthropology (created by Peter Levi);

Rufus Jones, a professor of chemistry (created by K. Alison LaRoche);

Zoe Kaplan, a professor of journalism (created by Susan Holtzer);

Neil Kelly (created by S.F.X. Dean);

Homer Kelly, a professor of English (created by Jane Langton);

Craig Kennedy, a professor of chemistry (created by Arthur B. Reeve);

Joanne Kilbourn, a Canadian professor of political science (created by Gail Bowen);

Hannah Land, a professor of political science (created by Amanda Mackay);

Loretta Larson, a professor of English (created by Joan Smith);

Annie Laurence, a professor of journalism (created by Carolyn G. Hart);

Loretta Lawson, a professor of linguistics (created by Joan Smith);

David Leonardo (created by Warren Murphy);

Graham Loudon (created by D.M. Devine);

Adam Ludlow, a professor of English (created by Simon Nash);

____________________

The first eight posts in this series list and provide very brief synopses of 400 films treating higher education:

The first post in this series, covering films ranked 351 to 400 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/07/09/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-351-400/

The second post in this series, covering films ranked 301-350 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/07/10/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-301-350/

The third post in this series, covering films ranked 251 to 300 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/07/11/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-251-300/

The fourth post in this series, covering films ranked 201 to 250 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/07/12/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-201-250/

The fifth post in this series, covering films ranked 151 to 200 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/07/14/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-151-200/

The sixth post in this series, covering films ranked 101 to 150 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/07/18/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-101-150/

The seventh post in this series, covering films ranked 51 to 100 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/08/03/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-51-100/

The eighth post in this series, covering films ranked 1 to 50 is available at: https://academeblog.org/2013/08/13/400-films-about-higher-education-or-at-least-set-on-campuses-1-50/

4 thoughts on “Amateur Detectives Featured in Mystery Novels and Series Who Are College and University Professors, A-L

  1. Janet Dawson, who in the 1980s was in the M.A. program in History at California State University, Hayward (now East Bay) where I teach, has written a series of mysteries set in northern California featuring a young woman detective named Jeri Howard. Howard is the fictional daughter of a fictional CSU, Hayward history professor, although the father is modeled after a real member of the department, now long retired. In the second novel in the series, Till the Old Men Die, the murder victim is another CSU, Hayward history prof, who is pushed down an outdoor stairwell on campus up and down which I and many other faculty have regularly trudged. Several other novels in the series employ campus settings as well, usually Cal States. She has a website at janetdawson.com

  2. Pingback: Amateur Detectives Featured in Mystery Novels and Series Who Are College and University Professors, M-Z | Academe Blog

  3. Pingback: Amateur Detectives Featured in Mystery Novels and Series Who Are College and University Administrators, Staff, and Students | Academe Blog

Your comments are welcome. They must be relevant to the topic at hand and must not contain advertisements, degrade others, or violate laws or considerations of privacy. We encourage the use of your real name, but do not prohibit pseudonyms as long as you don’t impersonate a real person.