The Best Novels Set in Every State: Part 3, Massachusetts to New Jersey

These are my alternatives to the list created by Melia Robinson and Melissa Stanger for Business Insider. I am excluding works of nonfiction and listing my top three choices for each state. Titles included in the list compiled by Robinson and Stanger are indicated in boldface.

Massachusetts The Scarlet Letter Nathaniel Hawthorne
Infinite Jest David Foster Wallace
The Friends of Eddie Coyle George V. Higgins
Michigan The Detroit Novels [Seven-Novel Series] Loren D. Estleman
them Joyce Carol Oates
The Road to Wellville T.C. Boyle
Minnesota Main Street Sinclair Lewis
Morte d’Urban J.F. Powers
In the Lake of the Woods Tim O’Brien  
Mississippi The Hamlet William Faulkner
Wolf Whistle Lewis Nordan
Delta Wedding Eudora Welty
Missouri The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain
Elmer Gantry Sinclair Lewis
The Twenty-Seventh City Jonathan Franzen
Montana A River Runs through It Norman MacLean
The Big Sky A.B. Guthrie, Jr.
Winter in the Blood James Welch
Nebraska My Antonia Willa Cather
Ceremony in Lone Tree Wright Morris
Isn’t It Romantic Ron Hansen
Nevada The Ox-Bow Incident Walter Van Tilburg Clark
Desert of the Heart Jane Rule
The Delivery Man Joe McGinnis, Jr.
New Hampshire Affliction Russell Banks
A Prayer for Owen Meany John Irving
A Separate Peace John Knowles
New Jersey Independence Day Richard Ford
American Pastoral Philip Roth
Rock Moody Garden State

_________________________

Part 1, Alabama to Georgia: https://academeblog.org/2013/10/21/the-best-novels-set-in-every-state-part-1-alabama-to-georgia/

Part 2: Hawaii to Maryland: https://academeblog.org/2013/10/22/the-best-novels-set-in-every-state-part-2-hawaii-to-maryland/#more-4715

4 thoughts on “The Best Novels Set in Every State: Part 3, Massachusetts to New Jersey

  1. Pingback: The Best Novels Set in Every State: Part 5, South Dakota to Wyoming | Academe Blog

Your comments are welcome. They must be relevant to the topic at hand and must not contain advertisements, degrade others, or violate laws or considerations of privacy. We encourage the use of your real name, but do not prohibit pseudonyms as long as you don’t impersonate a real person.