At the University of Akron, Some Olives Are Very Expensive

This is the opening of an article written by Karen Farkas for Celevland.com:

“AKRON, Ohio – A $556.40 olive jar in University of Akron President Scott Scarborough’s bedroom has become the flashpoint for those upset at the cost of renovations to the president’s home at a time when 161 employees lost their jobs.

The jar, listed among $141,142 in furnishings, drapes and carpeting bought as part of $950,000 in renovations for the university-owned home, has its own Facebook page and Twitter handle, @ssolivejar.

“The furnishings from Alan Garren Interiors and $375,000 worth of construction  were paid for with private donations. But the university also paid about $435,000 in tax dollars to companies and university employees working on the home,

“The olive jar’s Facebook page, created Thursday, lists it as a public figure. The profile picture is of an antique Greek olive jar with a red “SOLD” across it.

“Among the comments was this exchange: “Do you, Olive Jar, have job security? Is there a threat you may be ‘let go’ or replaced by say, a Ming Vase???” Olive Jar responded “I’m trying to figure out if there’s a way to outsource my job. If there is, I’m screwed.”

“The jar also wonders about its future on Twitter. . . .”

Karen Farkas’s Complete article can be found at: http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2015/08/a_556_olive_jar_in_university.html

 

 

3 thoughts on “At the University of Akron, Some Olives Are Very Expensive

  1. @academeblog, all this attention is really making me blush. I think it’s obvious that I have a social media presence because no human being could possibly get so much attention so fast. It’s a crazy world we live in, and we have an even crazier administration at #uakron.

  2. Pingback: Housing Provided to Public University Presidents in Ohio | The Academe Blog

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