In Exiting the Presidential Race, Walker Conflates His Financially and Morally Bankrupt Campaign with a Personal Message from God

Here is what Scott Walker said in his exit speech:

“The Bible is full of stories about people who are called to be leaders in unusual ways. Today, I believe that I am being called to lead by helping to clear the field in this race so that a positive conservative message will rise to the top of the field. With this in mind, I will suspend my campaign immediately.”

Here is what a Walker insider said about the reasons for his exit:

“’The short answer is money,’ said a supporter of Mr. Walker’s who was briefed on the decision. ‘He’s made a decision not to limp into Iowa.’

“The supporter said that Mr. Walker’s fund-raising had dried up after his decline in the polls and that campaign officials did not feel they could risk going into debt with the race so uncertain. The governor, who was scheduled to be in New York and Washington this week, partly to raise money, had built up an expansive staff, bringing on aides and consultants detailed to everything from Christian conservative outreach to Super Tuesday states. But his fund-raising did not keep pace with the money needed to sustain such an infrastructure.”

Apparently, Walker believes that God, like Walker himself, had a personal stake in his campaign–but that it somehow stopped short of whispering in the ears of wealthy donors when his campaign started to flounder.

In any case, one wonders which Biblical passage Walker has interpreted to mean, “Thou shall be a tool of the Koch brothers and prevent working people from having any recourse against great personal wealth and unmitigated corporate power.”

 

 

2 thoughts on “In Exiting the Presidential Race, Walker Conflates His Financially and Morally Bankrupt Campaign with a Personal Message from God

  1. When Walker entered the race AFL-CIO president Rich Trumka called him a “national disgrace.” Today Trumka tweeted: “Scott Walker is still a disgrace, just no longer national.”

  2. How is, or was, his campaign “morally” bankrupt? Is anybody who doesn’t believe in collective bargaining with public employees morally bankrupt?

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