The Ohio Conference Unanimously Endorses a Resolution Proposing a Legislatively Mandated Ratio of Full-Time Faculty to Administrators

This resolution is the last of four presented and unanimously endorsed at The Ohio Conference annual meeting on November 7.

Whereas an analysis of the effectiveness of institutions of higher learning indicated that the ideal ratio for full-time faculty to each administrator should be three to one; (i)

Whereas accrediting agencies recognize that having many more full-time faculty versus part-time faculty typically indicates a greater likelihood of high-quality instruction;

Whereas institutions of higher education should exercise caution in achieving balance between full-time and part-time faculty as to avoid the exploitation of either party while seeking to provide the highest quality of instruction;

Whereas guidance in achieving the aforementioned balance can be found by referencing an AAUP report on the “Status of Part-Time Faculty”;(ii)

Whereas part-time faculty are often hired to offset the cost of hiring more administrators;

Be it resolved that the Ohio Conference AAUP requests a close examination by the Ohio General Assembly of ratios of full-time faculty to administrators;

Be it further resolved that the Ohio Conference AAUP calls upon the U.S. Congress and the Ohio General Assembly to consider ratios of full-time faculty to both administrators and part-time faculty as critical factors for providing high-quality education.

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[i] Martin, Robert E. and Hill, Carter, Baumol and Bowen Cost Effects in Research Universities (March 2014). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2153122.

[ii] AAUP Report: Status of Part-Time Faculty: http://www.aaup.org/report/status-part-time-faculty.

One thought on “The Ohio Conference Unanimously Endorses a Resolution Proposing a Legislatively Mandated Ratio of Full-Time Faculty to Administrators

  1. THREE to one? That seems way, way too low. The article cited is about research universities, though, and I’m at a teaching college. That might explain the difference.

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