OCAAUP 2016 Annual Meeting: Resolution 2–Instruction First

POSTED BY MARTIN KICH

Whereas the primary mission of Ohio’s colleges and universities is to educate students,

Whereas colleges and universities have increasingly and irresponsibly devoted resources to bloated administrative bureaucracies, to equally ambitious and expensive sports programs supported by ever-more elaborate and more expensive athletic facilities, and a seemingly endless succession of other expensive construction projects, siphoning state monies and tuition dollars away from the academic mission,

Whereas the aforementioned misplaced priorities have reduced the number of full-time and tenured faculty in favor of part-time or adjunct faculty who receive compensation equivalent to that of fast-food workers and no benefits,

Be it resolved that the Ohio Conference AAUP encourages Ohio’s colleges and universities to adopt an “Instruction First” approach to budgeting to ensure that high- quality instruction for students can be guaranteed before allocations are made to enterprises and activities clearly outside of our institutions’ core missions.

 

2 thoughts on “OCAAUP 2016 Annual Meeting: Resolution 2–Instruction First

  1. While the existence of administrative bloat is true, there’s simply no empirical evidence of the following claim:

    “Whereas the aforementioned misplaced priorities have reduced the number of full-time and tenured faculty in favor of part-time or adjunct faculty who receive compensation equivalent to that of fast-food workers and no benefits”

    Full time faculty ranks are growing in absolute numbers and are keeping near perfect pace with student enrollments. Almost all adjunct hiring is supplemental, or a result of the adjunct-dependent for-profit higher ed industry.

    Lying about these statistical realities will not make them go away.

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