Presidential Residences, Outside of Ohio, Part 1

Alabama, U of

University of Alabama

 

 

Auburn U

Auburn University

 

Boise State University Photo Archive # C.0010.090.5A

Boise State University

 

Brandeis U

Brandeis University

 

California, U of

University of California

 

Chicago State U

Chicago State University

 

President's House (front facade), University of the Cumberlands

University of the Cumberlands

 

Darmouth C

Dartmouth College

 

Dayton, U of

University of Dayton

 

Delaware, U of

University of Delaware

Note: I recognize that the University of Dayton is in Ohio. In a previous post, I included images of the university-provided or subsidized residences of the presidents of the public university in Ohio–thus, the title of this post.

 

3 thoughts on “Presidential Residences, Outside of Ohio, Part 1

  1. The house shown for the University of California is called Blake House, located in Blake Garden in the Berkeley hills, which is open to the public. It has not been used as a presidential residence since 2008 when then-UC President Dynes resigned and called the deteriorating structure “unlivable.” When Janet Napolitano became UC president in 2013, the UC Regents authorized preliminary studies about renovation of the 90-year old structure (donated to the university in 1957), estimated to cost between $3.5 and $6 million, but as far as I’m aware it’s still abandoned. See this article: http://www.dailycal.org/2013/08/14/abandoned-uc-presidential-mansion-may-be-renovated-after-years-of-neglect/ Instead, UC leases a home in Oakland for Napolitano (UC’s main offices moved to Oakland from Berkeley some time ago) at $9,000/month. I don’t know what it looks like.

  2. Pingback: Presidential Residences Outside of Ohio, Part 2 | ACADEME BLOG

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