An Hour of Television on Higher Ed Issues from a Faculty Perspective


If you have been reading the posts in my series “Mismanagement and No Meaningful Oversight” (I have actually gotten several items behind in terms of re-posting those items from our chapter blog to this blog), you are aware of some of the issues that have been reaching critical mass at Wright State University but that are reflective of problems at most universities across the country.

This past Thursday, DA-TV in Dayton devoted an hour to a panel discussion about the issues at our university but very much tying those issues to broader statewide and national issues.

Although I was invited to participate on the panel, I was attending a professional conference. After viewing the video, I think that you will agree that my absence may have been something of a blessing because I cannot imagine that I could have spoken as articulately and as effectively as those AAUP leaders and members who did participate.

The panel included: John McNay, President of the Ohio Conference of AAUP; Tom Rooney, Treasurer of the Wright State Chapter; Adrian Corbett, Chief Negotiator of AAUP-WSU; Sirisha Naidu, Grievance Officer of AAUP-WSU; and Andrea Harris, a Lecturer in English and Women’s Studies who organized a student protest on our Dayton Campus.

If you are pressed for time, the first 7 ½ minutes are a sort of general news overview (the material is very interesting but not related to higher-ed per se).

Citizen Impact is hosted by Logan Martinez and produced by Tim Bruce. It is a project of the Miami Valley Full Employment Council (MVFEC), which works for the interests of low-income and unemployed people in the Dayton, Ohio, area.



Posts in the Ongoing Series “Mismanagement and No Meaningful Oversight”:

Item 1:

Item 2:

Item 3:

Item 4:

Item 5:



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